All posts filed under: Books

Books. Reading. Book Reviews. Book Recommendations.

Book Review: “Sweetbitter” by Stephanie Danler

“What else am I doing? I’m learning about food and wine and terroir and how to pay attention.” Every once in a while a book comes along that serves as a cautionary tale for overzealous readers, like myself. What is the warning?, you may ask. To remain wary of books that make it on all the popular lists, because once in a while all these media sites will be applauding what could only be described as an over-hyped dud. I was promised a book that would blow my socks off, instead what I read was a book that left me with the feeling of trying badly fitting shoes. It was an uncomfortable experience.

10 Books on my 2017 “Must Read!” list

I read a lot. Any given week I will find myself engrossed in something enlightening, inspirational, entertaining, hilarious, heart-wrenching or just downright weird. I like weird and off-beat reads. A lot. (just no stories about Zombies, m’kay). However, despite reading so voraciously and widely (in my opinion anyway), I still stick to very specific genres when left to my own devices – i.e. Fiction, Fantasy, Young Adult , Fan Fiction & Romance *ahem*. From the 40-odd books (and counting) I’ve lined up to get through, this year,Β  I thought I would share with you some of the ones I’m most excited to sink my teeth into…

Book Review: “Homegoing” by Yaa Gyasi

“The family is like the forest: If you are outside it is dense; if you are inside you see that each tree has its own position” My personal reading choices when it comes to non-fiction veer off in two rather opposing spectrums. On one swing of the pendulum you will find my deep appreciation for the fantastical and magical, which is anchored within the realm of wild possibility.Β On the opposite swing of the pendulum, my reading subject matter choice is anchored in stark, bleak reality relating to African identity and history, especially addressing colonisation and slavery. Most African and Black History remains untold, one-sided and/or incomplete and that’s why I appreciate authors like Yaa Gyasi, who take on the daunting task of bringing “our” stories (with their colourful, painful histories) to life through fresh, informative narratives.